Developing Staff Sensibilities & Determining Professional Responsibilities

Those who dance are considered insane by those who can’t hear the music
It has been noted that facilities that otherwise deal effectively with very
disturbed or acting out adolescents may be “overwhelmed by a
comparatively well-adjusted or well-behaved gay or lesbian teenager”
(Gonsiorek).
There is a realistic organizational challenge for administration and staff
within religiously affiliated agencies to find an open, affirming, and nonrejecting welcome for teens struggling with gender or sexual orientation
issues. For some reason, such agencies find it even easier to deal with
religious differences among residents, even in cases where the resident’s
religion (e.g Muslim) goes against the agency of dogma.
Creating a culture of Safety. Supervisors and managers in youth serving
facilities must tackle a culture where its acceptable for staff to use
derogatory language or to allow kids to do so. This can be addressed through
on-going education and by creating an organizational culture that requires
both staff and residents to behave respectfully toward one another. Ignoring
the issue is harmful because when staff members fail to “call kids out on it”
it’s an unspoken endorsement.
All formal and informal behavior by adults must recognize the reality
that we never know which teens are struggling with sexual issues,
making the task with this population very different from other concerns
about diversity.