Scenario Worksheet: Finding Resources

Scenario 1: A young man and his female partner are in a committed relationship and being sexually active with each other. Several months after their sexual relationship began, he realized he had an STI but didn’t know how to tell his partner.

How could a case worker help a young person in this situation?
• Help him plan and practice what he needs to say
• Offer to be there when he tells her or help identify someone who would be good support
• Make sure he has all the information about the STI and treatment for himself and to share with his partner
• Discuss how to prevent spreading the STI

Scenario 2: A young woman wanted to go on birth control but was concerned because her boyfriend didn’t want her to. The young woman was confused and didn’t know what to do.

How could an adult support a youth going through this?
• Discuss the indicators that this may not be a healthy relationship, do safety plan if needed
• Remind the youth that it is their body, and their future
• Review the facts of pregnancy and parenting, including that her boyfriend would at least have to pay child support
• Help her plan and practice what she wants to say to her partner
• Offer to be there for the conversation or to help identify someone who would be good support

Scenario 3: A young man told his case worker that his boyfriend was irritated that he asked him to use condoms. He claimed that he must want him to use a condom because he is having sex with other partners.

What could an adult say to a young person in this situation?
• Discuss the indicators that this may not be a healthy relationship, do safety plan if needed
• Help him plan and practice what he wants to say to his partner
• Explain to the youth that they have their own rights over their personal body
• Explain the benefits of condoms, and explore why the partner may not want to use them. It’s a good opportunity to talk about lubrication and how it makes condoms feel better AND work better.

Scenario 4: A case worker asked a young female client on her caseload if she had a boyfriend and the youth said no. It turns out the youth had a girlfriend but because the question was asked the way it was, the youth felt uncomfortable and didn’t want to open up to her case worker. The case worker then responded to the youth, “Then you don’t need to go to Planned Parenthood yet.”

How could the worker have handled this conversation differently?
• Talk and ask about the different relationships the youth may be involved in using open language. Don’t assume gender.
• Also don’t assume sex means a relationship. It could be a friend with benefits sort of thing.
• Finally, explaining the services offered at Planned Parenthood is good practice no matter who the youth is and no matter who they are or aren’t having sex with. They may have multiple partners, not fully report their sexual activity to case worker, or have other concerns that aren’t relevant
to their current partner(s).